Welcome to the AG Scrubs Blog

Here at AG we are dedicated to the prevention of infection in the medical workplace and one of the biggest steps in the prevention process is education. It is for this reason that the team at AG has decided to create this blog.

What to expect

The AG Scrubs Blog is meant to act as a library of articles for both informed researchers and the average knowledge seeker. A place where you can find fast facts with our posts acting as an outline to some of the top research papers available to the public. If you choose to dive deeper into a given subject we’ve got you covered as all of our sources will be linked at the bottom of every post thus making it easier for you to dive deeper into one of the largest problems affecting our hospitals today.

The United States Government estimates that 1 in every 31 patients who enter a hospital develop an HAI

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HAIs (Healthcare Associated Infection)

HAIs as defined by the APIC (Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology) is an infection that develops as a result of medical care. In their 2014 article they state that the most common of HAIs can be broken up into four categories:

1. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI):

Infection develops either during or after placement of a urinary catheter. Urinary catheters are normally placed in patients undergoing long surgical procedures who need assistance with passing urine, or those who are extremely ill. Bacteria enter the tubing and make their way into the bladder or kidneys.

2. Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI)

Infection develops either during or after placement of a tube placed into a vein. You may know this as an IV. IVs are normally placed to give fluids and medication or may be used to withdraw blood for testing. Bacteria enter the tubing and circulate in the blood.

3. Surgical Site Infections (SSI)

Infection develops either during or after a surgical procedure when bacteria enter the wound. Sometimes, these bacteria may also move to other sites and cause infection in the urine, blood, or lungs.

4. Pneumonia

Infection develops when bacteria enter the nose or mouth and travel to the lungs. Bacteria may also travel through a tube that has been inserted to help with breathing.

The United States Government estimates that 1 in every 31 patients who enter a hospital develop an HAI. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) has created a guide for patient safety that includes: Cleanliness, talking to your healthcare provider about your concerns and understanding the symptoms of infection. Below we have linked to that article as well as the others that aided in the writing of this post.

Links

APIC Article: “What is an HAI?”

https://apic.org/For-Consumers/Monthly-alerts-for-consumers/Article?id=what-is-an-hai

CDC Article: “Patient Safety: What you can do to be a safe patient”

https://www.cdc.gov/HAI/patientSafety/patient-safety.html

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